Monday, 5 December 2016

Tuesday, 8 November 2016

Welcome to Al Dhafra Grade 6 English Blog - Passive Voice

Welcome to Al Dhafra Grade 6 English Blog!
 
 

Active and Passive Voice

 
 
Learn the verb forms!
 



Passive Voice Game



 


 

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Welcome to Al Dhafra Grade 6 English Blog - 16-20 Oct 2016

 
Welcome to Al Dhafra Grade 6 Blog!
 
The simple present tense in English is used to describe an action that is regular, true or normal.
subject
present simple verb form
I
eat / play/ work
you
eat / play/ work
we
eat / play/ work
they
eat / play/ work
Sara and Maria
eat / play/ work
he
eats / plays/ works
she
eats / plays/ works
it
eats / plays/ works
Sara
eats / plays/ works
 
We use the present simple tense:
1. For repeated or regular actions in the present time period
  • I take the train to the office.
  • The bus to Dubai leaves every hour.
  • Abdulla sleeps eight hours every night during the week.
2. For facts
  • My uncle lives in Abu Dhabi.
  • A dog has four legs.
  • The sun rises in the east.
3. For habits
  • I get up early every day.
  • Fatima brushes her teeth twice a day.
  • They camp in the desert every winter.
4. For things that are always / generally true
  • It rains a lot in winter.
  • The Queen of England lives in Buckingham Palace.
  • They speak English at work.
    Forming Comparative and Superlative Adjectives
     
    One-syllable adjectives
    Form the comparative and superlative forms of a one-syllable adjective by adding –er for the comparative form and –est for the superlative.
    One-Syllable Adjective
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    Tall
    taller
    tallest
    Old
    older
    oldest
    long
    longer
    longest
    ·         Shamma is taller than Fatima.
    ·         Shamma is the tallest of all the students.
    ·         Abdulla is older than Saif.
    ·         Of the three students, Abdulla is the oldest.
    ·         My hair is longer than your hair.
    ·         Abdulla’s story is the longest story I've ever heard.
    If the one-syllable adjective ends with an e, just add –r for the comparative form and –st for the superlative form.
    One-Syllable Adjective with Final -e
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    large
    larger
    largest
    wise
    wiser
    wisest
    ·         Mariam’s car is larger than Reem’s car.
    ·         Leen's house is the largest of all the houses on the block.
    ·         Salem is wiser than his brother.
    ·         Rayan is the wisest person I know.

    If the one-syllable adjective ends with a single consonant with a vowel before it, double the consonant and add –er for the comparative form; and double the consonant and add –est for the superlative form.
    One-Syllable Adjective Ending with a Single Consonant with a Single Vowel before It
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    Big
    bigger
    biggest
    Thin
    thinner
    thinnest
    Fat
    fatter
    fattest
    ·         My camel is bigger than your horse.
    ·         My camel is the biggest of all the camels in Al Ain.
    ·         Hamad is thinner than Saif.
    ·         Of all the students in the class, Salem is the thinnest.
    ·         My sister is cleverer than your mother.
    ·         Shrek is the fattest person I've ever seen.

    Two-syllable adjectives
    With most two-syllable adjectives, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
    Two-Syllable Adjective
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    comfortable
    more comfortable
    most comfortable
    intelligent
    more intelligent
    most intelligent
    careful
    more careful
    most careful
    thoughtful
    more thoughtful
    most thoughtful
    ·         This morning is more peaceful than yesterday morning.
    ·         Abdulla’s house in the mountains is the most peaceful in the world.
    ·         Mohammed is more careful than Faisal.
    If the two-syllable adjectives ends with –y, change the y to i and add –er for the comparative form. For the superlative form change the y to i and add –est.
    Two-Syllable Adjective Ending with -y
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    happy
    happier
    Happiest
    angry
    angrier
    Angriest
    Busy
    busier
    Busiest
    ·         Hamad is happier today than he was yesterday.
    ·         Azza is the happiest girl in the world.
    ·         Hala is busier than Dima.
    ·         Mary is the busiest person I've ever met.
    Two-syllable adjectives ending in –er, -le, or –ow take –er and –est to form the comparative and superlative forms.
    Two-Syllable Adjective Ending with -er, -le, or -ow
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    narrow
    narrower
    narrowest
    gentle
    gentler
    gentlest
    ·         The roads in Ajman are narrower than the roads in Dubai.

    Adjectives with three or more syllables
    For adjectives with three syllables or more, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
    Adjective with Three or More Syllables
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    generous
    more generous
    most generous
    important
    more important
    most important
    intelligent
    more intelligent
    most intelligent
    ·         Rawan is more generous than Shaima.
    ·         Yara is the most generous of all the people I know.
    Exceptions:
    Irregular adjectives
    Irregular Adjective
    Comparative Form
    Superlative Form
    Good
    better
    best
    Bad
    worse
    worst
    Far
    farther
    farthest
    Little
    less
    least
    Many
    more
    most
    ·         Italian food is better than American food.
    ·         My dog is the best dog in the world.
 
 
 


Thursday, 13 October 2016

Test Revision


Keep calm and get ready for the test!
'Exam Time' will be 'Fun Time' if you use this blog!

Types of Sentences

 
 

Saturday, 3 September 2016

Welcome Back to School!



Starter
How does this picture make you feel?
 



The Butterfly Lion by Michael Morpurgo


Discussion

                                       

Activities

Judge

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Lawyers: Defense and Prosecution


Jury





How safe are you?

Power of Teamwork!



Forty Books Reading Challenge!
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