Sunday, 14 December 2014

Welcome to Al Dhafra Grade 6 English!


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Wednesday, 10 December 2014

Al Dhafra Grade 6 English Blog! Term 1 Final December 14, 2014 Revision

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More resources, worksheets and links will be added soon.





Adding prefixes:
A prefix is a group of letters placed at the start of a word.
dis-
disconnect     disadvantage        disagree
disappear       disapprove            disable
mis-
misbehave      mistake      misunderstand
un-
unhappy         uncertain      ungrateful
re-
recycle            rewrite          reread
in-
incorrect        inhuman        insane
im-
impossible     immature      immoral

How the prefix can change the meaning of a word
disadvantage        
not an advantage
unavailable
not available
mistake
not correct
unhappy
not happy
insane
not sane
immature     
not mature     

Click on the links to practice online quizzes and games:


Revision - Answer Key 
Spelling and Vocabulay
Workbook - Answer Key 
Words ending in –sure and –ture (page.6)
Examples:
a)
measure b)puncture c)nature d)insure e)enclosure f)creature g)pleasure h)adventure i)future j)treasure k)unsure l)fracture

sure: composure, leisure, exposure

ture: fixture, feature, vulture, structure, picture, gesture

Words ending in “shun” sound (page.7)
    a)beautician b)competition c)tension d)education e)conclusion f)technician g)subtraction h)musician
    fraction, creation, suspicion, pension, conversation, politician, attention

Comparatives and Superlatives (p.9)

Descriptor
Comparative
Superlative
tall
taller
tallest
angry
angrier
angriest
mean
meaner
meanest
dark
darker
darkest
long
longer
longer
hard
harder
hardest

Grammar and Punctuation
Adding Prefixes: dis-, im-, in-, re-, un- (page 6)
disconnect   impossible  inhuman misbehave recycle  uncertain
a) disappear, disapprove, disobedient, disagree
b) mistake, misunderstood, misfortune
c) unreasonable, unforgettable, ungrateful

  a)not an advantage b)not available
  c)wrong answer/choice d)not happy
  e)not sane   f)not mature

Adding Suffixes: -ness, -ian, -able, -less, -ful, 
-er (page 7)
a)technician b)musician c)electrician
d)beautician e)optician f)politician
a)fashionable b)gardener 
c) careful/careless
d) forgiveness e)footballer 
f) cheerful/cheerless
g) collectable  h)hopeful/hopeless

SentenceTypes:Statements/Questions/Exclamations/Commands (page 8)
a)Are you going swimming?
b)Do you love eating cakes?

a)statement. You know what time it is.
b)question. Do you know what time it is?
c)command. Answer me!

Using Modal Verbs: will, would, can, could, may, might, shall, should, ought to, must (p.9)
a) might / may
b) could/ would
c) should/ shall

Adverbials of Probability: certainly, definitely, maybe, possibly, never, often, sometimes, seldom, d, always (p.10)

a) It seldom rains in Australia
b) I will probably get a certificate this week at school.
c) I will definitely pick you up at 7:30pm outside the train station.
d) I often go to watch the football match on Saturdays and Sundays.

Tenses: past, present, future (p.11)
Past tense
They played football.
He did his homework.
The dogs chased the cat.

Present tense
We walk home from school.
He does his homework.
I write in my diary.
She picks flowers.
(Present continuous is also acceptable)

Future tense
They will play football.
I will write in my diary.
The dogs will chase the cat.
She will pick flowers for the kitchen.

Story Elements: Point of View
First Person – It’s when you talk about yourself or your group (I, we, me, us).
Third Person – It’s where you talk about someone else (he, she, it, him, her
Examples:
I went to the store. (first person)
She heard a strange noise. (third person)
We went inside the house. (first person)
It seemed like he liked video games.
The test was making us crazy. (first person)
My car was in an accident. (first person)
Forming Comparative and Superlative Adjectives
One-syllable adjectives
Form the comparative and superlative forms of a one-syllable adjective by adding –er for the comparative form and –est for the superlative.
One-Syllable Adjective
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
Tall
taller
tallest
Old
older
oldest
long
longer
longest
·         Shamma is taller than Fatima.
·         Shamma is the tallest of all the students.
·         Abdulla is older than Saif.
·         Of the three students, Abdulla is the oldest.
·         My hair is longer than your hair.
·         Abdulla’s story is the longest story I've ever heard.
If the one-syllable adjective ends with an e, just add –r for the comparative form and –st for the superlative form.
One-Syllable Adjective with Final -e
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
large
larger
largest
wise
wiser
wisest
·         Mariam’s car is larger than Reem’s car.
·         Leen's house is the largest of all the houses on the block.
·         Salem is wiser than his brother.
·         Rayan is the wisest person I know.

If the one-syllable adjective ends with a single consonant with a vowel before it, double the consonant and add –er for the comparative form; and double the consonant and add –est for the superlative form.
One-Syllable Adjective Ending with a Single Consonant with a Single Vowel before It
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
big
bigger
biggest
thin
thinner
thinnest
fat
fatter
fattest
·         My camel is bigger than your horse.
·         My camel is the biggest of all the camels in Al Ain.
·         Hamad is thinner than Saif.
·         Of all the students in the class, Salem is the thinnest.
·         My sister is cleverer than your mother.
·         Shrek is the fattest person I've ever seen.

Two-syllable adjectives
With most two-syllable adjectives, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
Two-Syllable Adjective
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
comfortable
more comfortable
most comfortable
intelligent
more intelligent
most intelligent
careful
more careful
most careful
thoughtful
more thoughtful
most thoughtful
·         This morning is more peaceful than yesterday morning.
·         Abdulla’s house in the mountains is the most peaceful in the world.
·         Mohammed is more careful than Faisal.
If the two-syllable adjectives ends with –y, change the y to i and add –er for the comparative form. For the superlative form change the y to i and add –est.
Two-Syllable Adjective Ending with -y
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
happy
happier
Happiest
angry
angrier
Angriest
Busy
busier
Busiest
·         Hamad is happier today than he was yesterday.
·         Azza is the happiest girl in the world.
·         Hala is busier than Dima.
·         Leen is the busiest person I've ever met.
Two-syllable adjectives ending in –er, -le, or –ow take –er and –est to form the comparative and superlative forms.
Two-Syllable Adjective Ending with -er, -le, or -ow
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
narrow
narrower
narrowest
gentle
gentler
gentlest
·         The roads in Ajman are narrower than the roads in Dubai.

Adjectives with three or more syllables
For adjectives with three syllables or more, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
Adjective with Three or More Syllables
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
generous
more generous
most generous
important
more important
most important
intelligent
more intelligent
most intelligent
·         Rawan is more generous than Shaima.
·         Yara is the most generous of all the people I know.
Exceptions:
Irregular adjectives
Irregular Adjective
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
good
better
best
bad
worse
worst
far
farther
farthest
little
less
least
many
more
most
·         Italian food is better than American food.
·         My dog is the best dog in the world.

Two-syllable adjectives that follow two rules. These adjectives can be used with -er and -est and with more and most.
Two-Syllable Adjective
Comparative Form
Superlative Form
clever
cleverer
cleverest
clever
more clever
most clever
gentle
gentler
gentlest
gentle
more gentle
most gentle
friendly
friendlier
friendliest
friendly
more friendly
most friendly
quiet
quieter
quietest
quiet
more quiet
most quiet
simple
simpler
simplest
simple
more simple
most simple
·         Big dogs are gentler than small dogs.
·         Big dogs are more gentle than small dogs.